Guide to the Williams Family Papers

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
Memorial Hall, Memorial Street, Deerfield, Mass.

Scope and Content Note:
The Williams Family Papers, which were received by the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial
Association from many sources over a long period of time, consist of four types of material: (1) approximately 3500 original manuscripts of the 18th and 19th centuries written by or addressed to various descendants of Robert Williams, “cordwayner” of Norwich, England, who came to this country in 1637 and settled in Roxbury, Mass.; (2) reproductions of similar manuscripts elsewhere in Deerfield or in other locations; (3) transcripts of Williams material; and (4) notes and correspondence of George Sheldon and others that relate to the Williams family. The numbers in superscript that follow many of the names in this guide are those assigned by George Sheldon in the Williams genealogy included in the second volume of his History of Deerfield, Massachusetts (1895).

Biographical Notes and Description of Manuscripts:
Thomas Williams15, a great-great grandson of Robert1, was born in 1736, studied medicine with Dr. Thomas Williams14 in Deerfield, and then settled in Roxbury, Mass. He married Abigail, daughter of Major Elijah Williams12, in 1760. Thomas died in 1815, his widow in 1818. He is represented by an undated letter from his father-in-law, asking him to bring or arrange to have brought various items from Boston. [See box of reproductions for photocopy of his will, dated 1814.]

Ebenezer Hinsdale Williams23, son of Thomas15 was born in 1761. He was a farmer who lived for many years at “Carter’s Land.” Later he bought several lots on the main village street and lived on Lot 42 from 1816 until his death in 1838. Known popularly as “Uncle Hinsdale,” he graduated from Harvard College in 1783, served as deacon of the first Congregational Church and as representative, selectman, and justice of the peace of the town. He married Joanna, daughter of Captain Reuben Smith of Northfield, in 1792. She died in 1852. His papers consist of indentures for the lease of the Carter’s Land Farm in Deerfield to Reuben and Henry Bardwell (1792); and for a house and lot to Orlando Ware (1805); and an execution of judgment in Williams’ favor in 1811.

Thomas Williams, second son of Thomas15, was baptized in 1764. He was a lawyer who
practiced in Roxbury, Mass. His papers consist of an attachment of Ebenezer Welles’ goods in Williams’ favor and an account related to an obligation owed by Consider and Eliphalet Dickinson, both in 1789; a letter from his uncle Elijah Williams in 1790 and one from Proctor Pierce of Lynn, Mass., in 1809.

John Williams5, the “Redeemed Captive,” a grandson of Robert1, was born in 1664,
graduated from Harvard College in 1683, and began preaching in Deerfield in 1686. The following year he married Eunice, daughter of the Reverend Eleazer Mather of Northampton, Mass. She was killed on March 1, 1704, following the French and Indian raid on Deerfield. In 1707, on his return from captivity, he married Abigail, widow of Benjamin Bissell of Hartford, Ct., and daughter of Thomas and Abigail (Warham) Allen. John died on June 12, 1729, his widow on June 21, 1754. His papers include a contemporary copy of a letter from Cotton Mather in 1705; an indenture for the
sale of two Deerfield River islands (1713); a fragment of a letter from his son Eleazer (1721), with a fragment of a sermon on the verso [formerly PP Mis. 12288]; three undated manuscripts relating to land; three orders to pay individuals he owed; and a photographic print of a sermon dated March 1723/24. Filed separately is a group of papers relating to the division of his lands east of the Green River among his children, 1736-37. See also John Williams Papers in the Historic Deerfield Library.

Eleazer Williams9, John’s oldest son, born in 1688, was absent at school and thus the only member of the family to escape death or captivity in 1704. He graduated from Harvard in 1708, settled as minister in Mansfield, Ct., in 1710, and died in 1742. His widow Mary, daughter of the Reverend Nehemiah Hobart of Newton, died in 1766. He is represented by a letter from his grandmother, Esther (Warham) Mather Stoddard, March
1705/6.

Samuel Williams, second son of John, was born January 24, 1689/90. He was captured in 1704 but was later redeemed. In 1711, “having the French Tongue,” he escorted a party of French prisoners to Canada. He served as Deerfield town clerk in 1713, and died in June of that year. He is represented by a letter he wrote in “Dearfield” on March 26, 1711, to an unidentified correspondent, relating to a book order.

Stephen Williams10, third son of John, was born in 1693 and captured in 1704. He was later redeemed. He graduated from Harvard in 1713, and settled as a minister in Longmeadow, Mass., in 1716. He served as chaplain in the Louisburg Expedition (1745), in the regiment of Col. Ephraim Williams in 1755, and in the Northern Army the following year. His first wife was Abigail Davenport of Stamford, Ct. She died in 1766; the following year he married Sarah, daughter of David Chapin and widow of Nathaniel Burt. Stephen died in 1782, Sarah in 1790. His papers, dated between 1706 and 1781, include letters from his father, nine from his cousin Elisha (son of William6), from his sisters Esther and Sarah, his brothers Eleazer and Warham, his stepmother Abigail, his son Nathan and his cousin William (son of Samuel4). One document is a fragment of an agreement with Joseph Noyes concerning land (1748); and there are fragments of a retained copy of a letter he wrote to President Wheelock of Dartmouth (1781). The papers also include a small number of his writings. “What befell Stephen Williams on his captivity”; his account of the Indian attack on Daniel Belding’s family [written on the verso of manuscripts
concerning land of John Colton of Springfield]; manuscript relating to the Turner’s Falls fight; manuscripts relating to Indian depredations in and near Deerfield; and notes for sermons in 1717 and 1730. Stephen Williams’s diaries, 1715-1782, from originals in Longmeadow, are among the Library’s microfilm holdings. See also Stephen Williams papers in the Historic Deerfield Library.

Abigail (Davenport) Williams, daughter of the Reverend John Davenport of Stamford, Ct., was the first wife of Stephen10, and the mother of all of his children. She died in 1766. She is represented by a diary, and typewritten transcript, kept in 1756 while her husband served as chaplain to Mass. Provincial troops during the Crown Point campaign.

Samuel Williams, third son of Stephen10 and Abigail, was born in Longmeadow, Mass., in 1729. He had the title of ensign. In 1760, he married Lucy, daughter of Deacon Nathaniel Burt; the couple had one son and seven daughters. Samuel died in Longmeadow in 1807. He is represented by a 1778 certificate signed by him and Jonathan Hale, Jr., members of a Longmeadow committee, addressed to persons then inoculated for smallpox [on the verso, 1780 accounts in the writing of his father]; and by a c. 1782 listing of items, with their values, in the estate of the Rev. Stephen Williams. Lucy Williams is represented by a letter written in Longmeadow in 1789 by her brother-in-law, William Stebbins.

Warham Williams11, youngest son of John5 and Eunice (Mather) Williams, was born in 1699. He was captured in 1704 and, according to George Sheldon, “when redeemed he had lost the English tongue, but spoke French fluently.” He graduated from Harvard in 1719, settled as minister at Waltham, Mass., in 1723, and continued as minister there until his death in 1751. In 1728, he married Abigail Leonard of Newton; she lived until 1789. His papers consist of two gatherings of notes for sermons, 1723-1749 and 1731-1744. With these there is a request by his relatives for prayers to be said for him by his congregation, c. 1751; and a document signed by his son, Leonard, daughter, Sarah, and daughters Abigail and Anne and their husbands, appointing David Hoyt of Deerfield as their attorney to collect rents due on land received as a bequest from their father.

Samuel Williams, son of Warham11 and Abigail (Leonard) Williams, was born in 1743 and graduated from Harvard in 1761. He was minister at Bradford, Mass., from 1765 to 1780, and in Rutland, Vermont, from 1789 to 1795. In the interval he served as Hollis professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Harvard College, 1780 to 1788. He became well known in the scientific world, and also wrote a two-volume history of Vermont, published in 1794. He died in Rutland in 1817. In 1768 he married Jane Kilbourne. Their son, Charles Kilbourne Williams, became chief justice and governor of Vermont. His papers consist of two letters, one from A[?] Porter of Haverhill in 1784 [the latter part obscured by Samuel’s notes on important uses of the atmosphere], the other from Ebenezer Storer of Boston, 1792; and three accounts, with Harvard College, Ralph Coffin and Thomas Hooker. Most of his papers, however, consist of his notes for sermons, enumerated in the Container List below. His correspondence regarding purchase of paper for the Rutland Herald is in the collections of the Bennington Museum, Bennington, Vermont; and the text of a daybook from the office of the Rutland Herald, kept by Samuel Williams and edited by Marcus A. McCorison, is printed in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, vol. 76, part 2 (October 1966): 293-395.

Abigail Williams, eldest child of John5 and Abigail (Allen) Bissell Williams, was born in
1708. About 1730, she married Colonel (and Reverend) Ebenezer Hin(d)sdale, founder of Hinsdale, New Hampshire. He died in January 1763; the following year she married Colonel Benjamin Hall of Cheshire, Ct. He died in January 1773. Her third husband was Judge Ebenezer Silliman of Fairfield, Ct., whom she married in mid-1773. After his death she returned to Deerfield. She died without issue in December 1787, and was buried next to her first husband in Hinsdale, New Hampshire. [Information regarding several bequests she made is in Sheldon’s History of Deerfield, vol. 2, pp. 204-15.]  Her papers have been divided into three chronological groups, each group accompanied by papers
of her husband at the time:
(1) Abigail’s papers include a fragment of what appears to be a power of attorney, letters from Joseph Root and Samuel Hopkins, and a receipt; accompanied by a letter to Colonel Hindsdale from Abigail (Leonard) Williams, widow of Warham11, a note and fragment of a letter, both signed by Hindsdale, and a receipt and deed related to the settlement of his estate.
(2) Letters Abigail Hall received from Hannah Williams and Eb[enezer Silliman] and a receipt from Abigail (Leonard) Williams; accompanied by fragments of three Benjamin Hall documents and a portion of a letter he received from Ebenezer Silliman.
(3) Letters to Abigail Silliman from her husband, three of his children, a son of her second husband, and from Sarah Chapin Burt Williams, Stephen Williams, Nabby Williams, and James Dana, together with receipts and accounts, many relating to the settlement of her estate; these accompanied by two letters received by Ebenezer Silliman, one from Abigail before their marriage, the other from Stephen Williams. Also a photocopy of her will.

Elijah Williams12, son of John5 and Abigail, was born in 1712, and graduated from Harvard in 1732 (later with an A.M. in 1758). He was captain of the Snow Shoe men in the old French war and major in the last French war, at which time he had a controlling influence on military movements on the frontier. For a short time he traded at Enfield, Ct., but most of his life he lived in Deerfield in his father’s homestead, and later kept store – known as the Ware Store for his successor at the corner of the lot. He served as judge of the court of common pleas, civil engineer, town clerk, and selectman. He first married Lydia Wright of Hatfield, Mass.; she died in 1749. The following year he married Margaret, daughter of William Pynchon of Springfield, Mass. Elijah died in 1771, his widow the following year. Most of the papers dated during the marriage of Elijah and Lydia are composed of receipts and accounts; many of the latter for purchases of dry goods from John Hunt of Boston. There is also one account for money owed Elijah by men in Captain William Williams’s company, and a fragment of an indenture for land in Enfield, Ct., signed by Elijah and Lydia. One note is addressed to Lydia by Timothy Dwight in 1747. Papers after 1750, numbering more than 100 items, include deeds from James Morris, Richard Crouch, John Arms, William Morris, and Elisha Higgins, all for tracts of
land in Guilford, New Hampshire. Receipts from Edward Holyoke to cover the cost of board for son, John, in Cambridge (1765-66), and a few papers relate to Elijah’s activities as town official. Most of the material is composed of accounts and receipts for dry goods, housewares, metal ware and foodstuffs. One receipt is directed to Margaret Williams for money she paid for cartage of articles for Elijah, Jr., and daughter Eunice. Other receipts directed to her and accounts signed by the children and the husbands of the daughters are among papers relating to the settlement of Elijah’s estate. He is also represented by numerous account and daybooks, kept separately.

Elijah Williams, Jr., son of Elijah12 and Lydia (Wright) Williams, was born in 1745,
graduated from Harvard in 1764, and obtained an A.M. from Dartmouth College in 1773. He practiced law briefly in Marlborough and Mendon before settling in Keene, New Hampshire in 1771. He was a Tory, who served as captain in the British Army. After his estate was confiscated he settled in Nova Scotia. During a return to Keene to collect debts, permitted by the peace treaty, he was forced to escape on horseback from an angry mob of Whigs. He died during a visit to Deerfield in 1793. His pre-Revolutionary papers consist mainly of powers of attorney granted him by various individuals, and promissory notes apparently connected to legal actions in which he was attorney. One 1722 letter from Gov. Wentworth relates to trespassers in the King’s woods. Later papers include a letter to Daniel Jones, written in New York in March 1782, in which Elijah asked for news of his brother “Jack” [John16, also a Tory] and other relatives; a copy of his will, dated June
1792; and a letter later that year from Joseph Williams, reporting on winnings from a lottery ticket. Papers relating to the settlement of Elijah’s estate by executors John Williams and Seth Catlin, show demonstrate the difficulty of collecting debts in Keene, NH; others relate to collecting half-pay for his service in the British Horse Guards.

Eunice Williams, daughter of Elijah12 and Lydia (Dwight) Williams, was born sometime in the 1740s. She married William Felton in 1773. She is represented by two papers, an account for carting in 1771, and a 1773 receipt. Eunice is also mentioned in the will of her aunt, Abigail Williams Hinsdale Hall Silliman. See William’s Family Papers, Box 3, folder 3 (papers of Abigail Hindsdale).

John Williams16, son of Elijah12 and Margaret (Pynchon) Williams, was born in 1751. He graduated from Harvard in 1769, studied law and practiced for a time in Salem, Mass., with William Pynchon. He next settled in Deerfield, and operated the old store on the Common, engaging in an extensive trade in lumber, in the manufacture of staves, and in trading pot ashes and pearl ashes, beef, corn and flour. He was also active in civil affairs, serving as register of deeds for Hampshire District, justice of the peace, and member of the council. He was also active in the establishment of Deerfield Academy. He was a Tory during the Revolutionary War and served a brief term in jail after the war. He was married to Elizabeth Orne from 1774 until her death in 1785. In 1802 he married Eunice Woodbridge. He died in 1816, his widow in 1832. His earliest papers, dated 1765-1769, are receipts for board and other expenses while he was a student at Harvard. Those of 1770-1771 consist of receipts and brief notes that relate to personal and professional dealings while he practiced law in Salem. The major part of his papers, however, consist of receipts, accounts, correspondence and other business papers that relate to the years he was a merchant in Deerfield, for a time in partnership with James and Edward Upham of
Greenfield, Mass. During those years his cousin, Thomas15, acted as his agent in Roxbury and Boston a number of times. In 1781-82, several items deal with the refusal of the Reverend Cornelius Jones to accept payment of a bond in Continental Currency, a controversy finally settled by arbitration in 1784. A similar controversy caused by John’s Tory leanings was settled with Charles Sigourney in 1789. Also in that year John heard that his son Richard, in Andover, Mass., was “well and a very fine scholar.” A letter of 1802 from Philadelphia notified John of two “wrought plate …finished by an American Artist of this City” that were being sent by the banks of the United States, North America, and Philadelphia in recognition of his service in the prosecution of forgers of counterfeit bank notes. A large segment of later papers, from 1788 on, relate to the Harvard Lottery and John’s role as one of the managers. Two papers of his widow, Eunice, (relating to her dowry and articles belonging to her) are in the final folder.

Richard Williams, son of John16 and Elizabeth (Orne) Williams, was born at Nantucket in 1775. He was a student at Phillips Andover Academy from 1789 through 179[?], then studied law with Theodore Sedgwick of Stockbridge, Mass. He died without issue at the age of 21, in 1796. Most of his papers consist of accounts for expenses while he was a student, including payments to the Academy and bills for paper, quills, shoe repair, stage coach fare to and from Boston. A folio volume is concerned with his study of arithmetic, entitled by George Sheldon as “Arithmetical Manuscriptum” [formerly N. Pers. No. 5036 in the PVMA library]. One letter from his father in 1790 asks Richard to come for vacation by horseback and to bring an account of his debts and the state of his clothes. A letter from his brother, John, in 1793 was written when John was a student at Charlestown Academy.

John Williams, Jr., younger son of John16 and Elizabeth (Orne) Williams, was born in
1778. He attended Charlestown Academy and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1798. He was a merchant in Cheapside for a time and later went to the East Indies, first as mate, then as captain of a vessel (about 1803). He died at the Isle of Bourbon in 1806. His early papers relate to expenses of tuition, student supplies, clothing, and transportation during
the years of his academy and college training. One account is for the parchment and writing of his college diploma. Included is a printed “catalogue” of members of the sophomore class in January 1797 (with a manuscript note dated 1799). In the years that followed his graduation he received a number of letters from friends who were still students at Dartmouth, but most of the papers concern his dealings as a merchant. Many of the merchants with whom he traded were in New York, Hartford, and Salem, Mass.; less so in Deerfield and nearby towns. In April 1803, he applied to Messrs. Bailey & Bogart for a berth as supra cargo or assistant on a ship going to ports beyond Cape of Good Hope. There is no evidence to show that this application was successful, but in March 1805 he shipped from Salem as master of the Brig Reward for the Isle of Reward and St. Denis Isle of Bourbon. The brig sailed for America in July 1806. Williams died at St. Denis the following month. His last papers include a receipt for his doctor’s attendance, an account of the medication given him, and the expenses of his funeral.

William Williams6, son of Isaac3 and Martha (Parke) Williams, was born in 1665. He
graduated from Harvard College in 1683 [his cousin John was in the same class], and became an outstanding minister in Hatfield, Mass. In 1686, he married Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Seaborn Cotton of Hampton, New Hampshire; two of their five children died in infancy. Elizabeth died in 1698; the following year William married Christian Stoddard, daughter of the Rev. Solomon Stoddard of Northampton, Mass. They had four children. William died in 1741, his widow in 1764.

William Williams17, son of William13 and Hannah (Stoddard) Williams, and a grandson of William6, was born in 1713, and graduated from Harvard in 1729. He lived in Deerfield from 1743 until about 1754, when he moved to Pittsfield, Mass. He spent many years in military service before the Revolution, during which he was a Tory. He also was active in civil affairs, serving in Deerfield as justice of the peace and selectman, and while a resident of Pittsfield, Mass., as justice of the court of common pleas and judge of probate. He married first Miriam Tyler of Boston and second Sarah, daughter of Thomas Wells of Deerfield. His third wife was Hannah, daughter of Samuel Dickinson of Deerfield. William died in 1784. His papers consist of an account of travel allowances to Moses Graves, 1740-1747; a letter relating to the purchase of cattle; a quitclaim to land in New Hampshire; and an account of articles bought at Boston in 1761. With these are three papers of his widow Hannah: a deed to land in Conway purchased from her by Joseph Boyden, a summons to David Sexton in a plea of ejectment, and adeed to Joseph Shearer of Pittsfield for land in various Hampshire county towns formerly belonging to her father.

Elizabeth Williams, daughter of William13 and Hannah (Stoddard) Williams, was born
about 1715. She is reported to have married a Mr. Crocker of Ipswich, Mass. She is represented by a letter from her father, written while she was in Deerfield comforting her
sister Esther, who was distraught after the departure of her husband, Dr. Thomas Williams14, to serve as surgeon in the campaign of 1756.

Elisha Williams, second son of William6 and Elizabeth (Cotton) Williams, was born in
1694, graduated from Harvard in 1711, and served as minister at Newington, Ct., from 1722 to 1726. He was president of Yale College from 1726 to 1739, and was later captain of regiment in the Cape Breton expedition (1745), and colonel of a regiment raised for the invasion of Canada. He died in 1755. He is represented by one paper: a memorandum regarding payment to John Beeman for a share in the ship Success. 

Solomon Williams, son of William6 and Christian (Stoddard) Williams, was born in 1701, and was ordained minister at Lebanon, Ct., in 1722. He received the degree of doctor of divinity from Yale in 1753. His wife was Mary, daughter of Samuel Porter of Hadley. Solomon died in 1776. His papers consist of two letters from Nehemiah Bull, who seems to have been Williams’ agent for the sale of land. Nehemiah was a brother of John P. Bull of Deerfield.

Ezekiel Williams, son of Solomon and Mary (Porter) Williams, was born in 1729 and died in 1818. He is represented by one manuscript, a letter directed to him in Hartford, Ct., by William Williams of Dalton, Mass., in 1801, telling of lightning damage.

Israel Williams, youngest son of William Williams6, was born in 1709. He was a colonel in the French and Indian War, and a Tory during the Revolution. His wife was Sarah, daughter of Colonel John Chester. Israel died in 1789. His papers include a copy of his father’s will, of which he was executor, and a list of articles not specifically devised; a quitclaim release by Moses Graves from a partnership account; a lengthy memorandum by Israel relating to the town of Hadley, Mass.; several manuscripts relating to his
controversy with the Reverend Joseph Lyman and his eventual suspension from the Hatfield church; letters from his son William, who had met with disappointments and difficulties in Dalton, and the need to get a minister for the church there, and from his nephew, Samuel W. Williams, who was making land purchases for Israel in Connecticut; and letters from his son-in-law, Elisha Billings, telling of the serious illness of his wife Elizabeth, and John Chandler Williams, announcing the birth of his daughter in 1786.

Israel Williams, Jr., son of Israel and Sarah (Chester) Williams, was born in Hatfield,
Mass. Little information about him is available. Dr. Stephen West Williams noted only that he “lived on the paternal estate and died a bachelor.” His one paper in the collection suggests that he was a trader: it is an account listing ribbon, yard goods and caps bought of Israel by Thomas Cutler.

William Williams, son of Israel and Sarah (Chester) Williams was born in Hatfield in 1735. In 1763 he married his first cousin Dorothy (or Dolly), daughter of the Reverend Jonathan and Dorothy (Williams) Ashley. The couple had eight children. Sometime after 1773 they moved to Dalton, Mass., where William served as clerk of the court and as member of the General Court, as well as deacon of the church. He died in 1808, his widow in 1833. His papers consist of an order he signed as clerk to the selectmen or assessors of Deerfield to raise money for the expenses of Hampshire County; a letter from his daughter, Charlotte Porter, in 1802; and a copy of a letter he addressed to Major David Dickinson, the husband of his wife’s sister, Elizabeth, in 1807.

Dorothy (Ashley) Williams, daughter of the Reverend Jonathan and Dorothy (Williams) Ashley, was born in 1743. In 1763, she married her cousin, William Williams, named above. Their daughters Dolly and Charlotte, and the latter’s son James and daughter Caroline, are mentioned below. Dorothy died in 1833. Her papers include letters from her father before and after her marriage; one letter from William shortly before their marriage and a series of seven letters he wrote her from Boston while serving in the legislature (1799-1801); and letters from her daughter Dolly while visiting her sister Charlotte in Hadley, Mass. in 1795, from her son William in Argyle, NY, shortly after her husband’s death, and from her son Statham in Utica, NY.

Dorothy “Dolly” Williams, daughter of William and Dorothy (Ashley) Williams, was born in Hatfield, Mass., in 1765. She elected to stay there and care for her grandfather when her family moved to Dalton, Mass. She appears to have joined them in Dalton later. She never married. The earliest of her papers are letters from her father in 1785 and 1786 in which he regretted her decision to stay in Hatfield. Later papers include a memorandum from her uncle, Elisha Billings, in regard to bequests to her from her aunt, Elizabeth (Williams) Billings; a number of additional letters from her father, one written while he was serving in the legislature; and letters from her sister Charlotte, her brother-in-law, William Porter, and her mother. Filed with her papers is a letter she wrote to her sister-in-law, Nancy Williams in Conway, Mass.

Charlotte (Williams) Porter, a second daughter of William and Dorothy (Ashley)
Williams, was born in Hatfield, Mass. In 1794, she married William Porter of Hadley. Papers of two of their children, a son James and a daughter Caroline are described below. Charlotte’s papers consist of an unsigned letter from a brother, one from a niece, Emily [Hill], and one from a friend, Esther S. Houghton of Northfield, Mass. Filed with these are two letters addressed to her son, James, written by his Aunt Dolly.

Caroline W. Porter, a daughter of William and Dorothy (Ashley) Williams, was born in
Hadley, Mass. She attended Westfield Academy in 1813; her papers include letters from her parents while she was a student there. Others are letters from friends. Four papers were apparently school exercises.

Abigail (Jones) Williams, daughter of Josiah Jones of Watertown, Mass., became the
second wife of Ephraim Williams7 in 1719. She is represented by a letter from her nephew, William Williams13, minister at Weston, Mass., which she received shortly after the death of her husband in 1754.

Ephraim Williams, older son of Ephraim7 and Elizabeth (Jackson) Williams, was born in 1715. According to tradition he visited England, Spain and Holland in his youth and, although he had little formal schooling, he had an admiration of learning. He spent the last ten years of his life [1745-1755] as a colonial soldier, with headquarters at Fort Shirley, Mass., and latter at Fort Massachusetts. In 1750, the General Court granted him 190 acres near the latter fort and he held lots in West Township [i.e., Williamstown]. Never married, Williams left a large part of his estate to support and maintain a free school in West Township, provided that the township fell within the jurisdiction of Massachusetts and was renamed Williamstown. Colonel Williams was killed at the battle of Lake George in Sept. 1755. His papers include the address page only of a letter addressed to him as “now on his March toward Crown Point”; a transcript of a letter he wrote at Albany to his first cousin, Israel Williams, in which he enclosed his will; typewritten copies of an inventory of his personal effects and the executor’s inventory of his books, and a photocopy of his will, probated in Northampton, Mass.

Thomas Williams14, son of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Jackson) Williams, was born in
Stockbridge, Mass., in April 1718, less than two weeks before his mother’s death. He studied medicine, and in 1739 settled in Deerfield where he became prominent in town affairs as well as in his profession. He was surgeon in the Canadian expedition of 1746, at the battle of Lake George in 1755, and in the campaign of 1756. In Deerfield, where he lived on Lot 9, he served as selectman, town clerk, judge of probate, and justice of the court of common pleas. In 1740, he married Anne, daughter of Timothy Childs. She died in 1746 and about two years later he married Esther, daughter of William Williams13 of Weston, Mass. Thomas died in 1775, his widow in 1800. The earliest of his papers are two notebooks on medical subjects: on the cover of the first “Liber/Thomas Williams/& Jure me tenet/Anno Domini/ April 6th 1738”; the second, also dated 1738, contains his notes on “Dr. W. Salmon’s Botanology”; and with these is filed a small gathering on treatments of a bite of a mad dog and other ailments. Other papers are dated from 1746 (Governor William Shirley’s commission to Thomas as surgeon in Colonel Joseph Dwight’s
regiment) to 1775. They include a series of accounts with Dr. Silvester Gardiner of Boston and with Shepard and Hunt of Northampton, Mass., from whom he got medical supplies; accounts with Richard Billings, Samuel Eliot, Israel Williams, Jr., of Hatfield, Mass., and others from whom he bought fabrics and household items; and correspondence with various members of his family: his father Ephraim7, who expressed disappointment that his son decided not to settle in Stockbridge, his brother Ephraim, his sister Abigail, his lawyer son Thomas15, his father-in-law William Williams13 of Weston, and brother-in-law Solomon, also of Weston, and his nephew Erastus Sergeant. A letter from Abraham Fuller, executor of the estate of Mary (Jackson) Cook relates to the bequest to Thomas of a silver tankard [now in the Historic Deerfield collection] and silver “Cann” to his daughter, Mary Cook Williams. Other items include a memorandum relating to the Reverend Warham Williams’ lands (1751), a petition to the Council and General Court (1757) for payment of
soldiers, and reimbursement of money advanced by his brother Ephraim. There is also a group of papers relating to the settlement of his estate, several to actions brought by his widow and executrix to recover debts. Few papers relate to the public offices in which he served. See also his medical account and daybooks.

Esther (Williams) Williams, daughter of William13 and Hannah Stoddard Williams, was born in Weston in 1726. She became the second wife of Thomas Williams14 about 1726, and served as executrix of his estate. Several of their eleven children are named below. Esther died in 1800. A number of her papers are letters from her brother-in-law, Reverend Stephen West of Stockbridge, Mass., in regard to her son Stephen who went to live with the Wests after his father’s death (one letter is from Stephen, asking for money when he was a student at Yale). Mr. West had the unhappy duty to write to her about her son’s untimely death at the age of 31. Other letters are from her sister, Elizabeth, and the latter’s husband, Joseph Buckminster; from her daughters Cynthia and Martha (Polly), and the latter’s husband, Jeremiah West. There are two copies of her will (1799) and a detailed inventory of household goods in her estate.

Anna (Williams) Dwight, daughter of Thomas14 and Anna (Childs) Williams, was born in 1743. In 1768, she married Elijah Dwight of Great Barrington, Mass. Her death occurred in Deerfield in 1810. She is represented by one paper – a letter from her brother-in-law, Dr. Jeremiah West, who wrote to inform her of the illness of his wife, her step-sister Martha, and the death of another sister, Elizabeth (Williams) Barnard.

Ephraim Williams19, son of Thomas14 and Esther (Williams) Williams, was born in
Deerfield in 1760. He received an honorary master’s degree from Williams College in 1795. He studied law and practiced some 20 years in partnership with the distinguished jurist, Theodore Sedgewick, in the courts of Berkshire Co. After what he considered an indignity received at the hands of a presiding judge, he moved from Stockbridge to Deerfield and lived on Lot 15. Known as “Uncle Bob,” he served in the Massachusetts legislature, was a presidential elector in 1812, and was the editor of the first volume of Massachusetts Reports. About 1815 he married Emily Trowbridge. He died in 1835, his widow in 1872.
His papers include writs of attachment and a long memorandum regarding land leased by Abiel Stevens, letters from Stephen Higginson, Henry Ware, John Fessenden and, mainly, from members of his family — his sister Cynthia, brothers Solomon, Elijah and William Stoddard. He also received a number of letters from his nephew, Henry Williams.

Emily (Trowbridge) Williams, daughter of David and Sarah (Woodbridge) Trowbridge, was born about 1780, probably in Hatfield. She and Ephraim Williams19 were married about 1815 and the couple had one son, mentioned below. Esther died in Middletown, Ct., in 1872. Her papers consist of three letters she received from her husband in 1816 while he was serving in the legislature, and, after his death, a deed to several tracts of land in Deerfield which she purchased from Augustus Wells.

John Williams, son of Ephraim19 and Emily (Trowbridge) Williams, was born in Deerfield in 1817. He entered Harvard in 1831, but having become an Episcopalian through the influence of Reverend Benjamin Davis Winslow, he transferred to Washington College (after 1845 Trinity College) in Hartford, Ct. He served as tutor there from 1837 to 1840, spent the following year in England and Scotland, and on his return entered the priesthood in 1841. He was a rector of Saint George’s church in Schenectady, NY, until 1848, and president of Trinity College from 1848 to 1853 (and continued as lecturer of history there until 1892). He became assistant bishop to Dr. Brownell, bishop of Connecticut, in 1851, and in 1887 was presiding bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He died in 1899, unmarried. His papers consist of a volume of his lecture notes taken at Trinity in 1849; letters from his cousin Elijah Dwight Williams in 1837 and from Dr. H.A. Dubois in 1867, relating to the wounding of Ephraim Williams; his copy of his tribute to Dr. J.E. Blake and a tribute to Bishop Williams by R.H. Gessner; a wax impression of his seal as bishop; and a memorandum on Protestant Episcopal claims
in an unidentified handwriting. A diary of his trip to Scotland is in the Diary Collection.
William Stoddard Williams20, son of Thomas14 and Esther (Williams) Williams, was born
in 1762. He studied medicine with Dr. Sergeant of Stockbridge, Mass., graduated from Williams College, and after a brief residence in nearby Richmond he settled in Deerfield. There he had an extensive practice and served as town clerk for many years. In 1786, he married Mary, daughter of David Hoyt, and the couple had six children. Mary died in 1821; the following year he married Eliza Lucas of Taunton, Mass. He died in 1829, his widow in 1844. His early papers consist mainly of letters he received from Deerfield while he was living in Stockbridge and Richmond — letters from his brothers Ephraim and Elijah; his sisters Martha (Patty), Anna, and, particularly, Cynthia; from Mary (Polly) Hoyt before their marriage. A pronouncement by the selectmen of Deerfield in 1782 stated that William Stoddard Williams had always been a “friend to the independence of America.” There is a list of books he used in studying medicine with Dr. Sergeant, and certificates in 1785 and 1786 from Dr. Sergeant and Oliver Partridge testifying to Williams’ proficiency in his medical studies and thus his qualification as a physician. In 1805, he and his wife asked for the prayers of people in Deerfield following the death of their daughter Marian. In separate files are promissory notes and receipts, 1786-1828; orders for medical supplies (mainly from Ebenezer Hunt of Northampton, 1785-1828); and, during the same period, miscellaneous records of treatments and prescriptions. See also his account and daybooks.
Alexander Williams34, son of Thomas24 and Nancy (Hawks) Williams and grandson of
William Stoddard Williams20, was born in Deerfield in 1814. He was a farmer and fruit grower and, like his father, moved to Kirkland, Ohio, about 1838. In 1841, he married Martha G. Cummings, the mother of his seven children. She died in 1857. His second wife, whom he married in 1878, was Mary (Goodwin) Williams, widow of Charles B. Williams.
His papers include a volume that contains an account of a trip he made to Bangor, Maine, from July to November 1835; a record of weather, 1837-38; and brief diary entries during 1853 and 1855-58.
His unbound papers include two letters from his sister Marian, the second including a letter from his mother, while he was in Bangor; and invitations to balls in Deerfield in 1832, 1835, and 1837 [formerly N-cei/5128, 5129(1), and 5129(2) in the PVMA library]. Filed to follow his papers is a volume containing 49 pages of “Communications from spirits/Mrs. M. G. Williams medium” with a typescript of the first 17 pages laid in. One passage from “Grandpa Cummings” and entries dated 1853 and 1855 suggest that the medium was Martha G. (Cummings) Williams, first wife of Alexander Williams. This volume was formerly Z-w 13671 in the PVMA library.

Stephen West Williams25, second son of William Stoddard20 and Mary (Hoyt) Williams, was born in 1790. He studied medicine with his father, supplementing this training by attending medical lectures at Columbia College, NY, for a year. He settled in Deerfield where he lived on the south part of Lot 14. In addition to his practice he studied botany and chemistry and did research on local and family history. He occasionally lectured on medical jurisprudence at the Berkshire Medical Institution (1823-31), at Dartmouth Medical School (1838-41), and at Willoughby University in Ohio (1838-53). In addition, he wrote for the New York Historical Society and the Massachusetts Medical Journal. In 1818, he married Harriet Taylor Goodhue (1799-1874), daughter of Dr. Joseph Goodhue, an army surgeon, and the couple had four children. In 1850 they moved to Laona, Illinois. Stephen died there in 1855. His widow died in 1874. His papers include relatively little correspondence, the major portion of which consists of letters from Dr. Valentine Mott, with whom Stephen had studied at Columbia College. There are also
letters he received from other physicians: Oliver Wendell Holmes, W.A. Wilkins, George Wright, Joseph Goodhue (his father-in-law) — and retained copies of letters he wrote to Dr. Mott and Dr. Wright. Several letters in 1845-46 from G. B. Zieber, Philadelphia booksellers, tell of their difficulty in finding buyers for Dr. Williams’ work, presumably his American Medical Biography. Most of his papers are composed of writings: they include his extensive notes on medical cases; a manuscript draft of his “Ancient History of Pocumtuck or Deerfield”; a memoir relating to the Reverend John Williams and brief biographical notes about his father, William Stoddard Williams; a rough draft and subsequent manuscripts of his “Historico Genealogical Account of the Family of
Williams in America and other matters”; and his manuscript titled “An Abridgement of the North American Sylva or a Description of the forest Trees of the United States, Canada & Nova Scotia” by F. Andrew Michaux (one volume). After many years, the two volumes of his “American Herbarium” were brought together by the gift in 1980 from Mrs. Roberta Poland (who had received it from Miss Elizabeth Fuller) of volume one, containing a collection of plant specimens, where it joined the second volume, containing a botanical description of the specimens, which had been purchased by Mr. Henry Flynt in 1959. The “American Herbarium” is in the Historic Deerfield Library special collections. See also his account and daybooks.

Caroline (Williams) Putnam, daughter of Stephen West Williams25 and Harriet (Goodhue) Putnam, was born in 1825. In 1852, she married Dr. Lemuel D. Putnam of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and became a prominent figure in society there. She is represented by one paper: a carbon copy of a typescript poem, attributed to her (1905).

Ephraim Williams27, son of William Stoddard and Mary (Hoyt) Williams, was born in
1797. He was a farmer and remained in the old homestead. He was active in town affairs, serving as selectman for eight years. In 1822, he married Rebecca, daughter of Edward Jackson of Newton, Mass. The couple had seven children, several of whom are mentioned below. Ephraim died in 1870, his wife sometime after 1868. His papers include a letter from his father in 1822; three deeds, one for land purchased, the other two for land and for spring water rights that he sold, a letter from his cousin, Bishop John Williams, enclosing a copy of a telegram he had received in regard to the wounding of Ephraim’s son and
namesake in 1867; and a copy of his will.

Rebecca (Jackson) Williams, daughter of Edward Jackson, was born in 1799. She and
Ephraim Williams27 were married in 1822. She died sometime after 1868. Most of her papers are letters she received from her son, Ephraim, Jr., while he was in military service. Three letters are from his commanding officer relating to Ephraim’s wounding in 1867.
There are also two earlier items: her autographed copy of Brief Sketch of the First Settlement of Deerfield, Mass., [by Elihu Hoyt], Greenfield, 1833; and a ticket to a concert by Jenny Lind in Northampton, Mass.

Eliza Dawes Williams, daughter of Ephraim27 and Rebecca (Jackson) Williams, was born in 1827. She apparently lived at home with her family and never married. Her brother, Ephraim, Jr., addressed to her (but with content for other family members) nearly 300 letters while he was in military service, 1860-67. These constitute the major part of her papers. They are preceded by a few undated school exercises, and followed by letters from her sister, Rebecca, the major part written while she was traveling in Europe, and from their cousin, Ralph Williams, Jr. Her papers also include a diary, kept between Oct. and Dec. 1853, when she was 26.

Mary Williams, second daughter of Ephraim27 and Rebecca (Jackson) Williams, was born in 1829. In 1851, she married George Wilson of Boston; the couple lived there. Mary died in 1855. Her papers include letters written after her marriage from her father, her brother Ephraim when he was a school boy, and from her sisters Eliza and Rebecca; and a diary she kept, Oct. to Dec. 1853.

Rebecca Williams, youngest daughter of Ephraim27 and Rebecca (Jackson ) Williams, was born in Deerfield in 1832. She and Alfred R. Field were married in 1859 and the couple had two sons, who died in childhood, and a daughter, Mary, who is named below. Her husband died in a railroad accident in 1870. In 1894, Rebecca went to Hartford, Ct., to preside over the home of her cousin, Bishop John Williams. She died in March 1904. Her papers consist almost entirely of correspondence, along with an 1848 copy book. The earliest dated item is a letter from Luther B. Lincoln, her Deerfield Academy instructor. Most of the letters from her family are from her brother Ephraim while he was in military service, with a few also from her mother and her sister Eliza (“Lizzie”), from her cousin Ralph, Jr., her husband, Alfred, and her granddaughters, Katharine and Elizabeth Fuller. Letters from friends include those from George and Agnes Fuller; Annie, Lizzie, and Stephen Higginson, and Mary P. Wells Smith. There is one letter from Edward Hitchcock and a memorandum headed “The Hitchcock House in the Lane”; valentines, and daguerreotypes (photocopies; originals in Memorial Hall) of her son Russell. A printed obituary of Rebecca is included.

Mary Williams Field, only daughter of Alfred R. and Rebecca (Williams) Field, was born in Greenfield, Mass., in 1863. In the 1870s, following the death of her father and the second of two younger brothers, her mother took her to Europe where they spent several years. She and George Spencer Fuller were married in 1889. Her papers are filed with the Fuller-Higginson Family Papers. Her papers before her marriage consist of a letter from Robert Higginson in 1871; three journals kept while she and her mother were traveling abroad in Scotland, England, and several cities on the Continent, May 1873-April 1874; and a diary volume with printed headings dated 1854 which she used, obviously much later, to enter undated memoranda. There is also a Smith College quiz book in which she entered notes about her uncle, Ephraim Williams, Jr., and earlier members of the
family.

William Stoddard Williams, older son of Ephraim27 and Rebecca (Jackson) Williams, was born in 1834. He became an insurance agent in Greenfield, Mass. His papers include letters written by his niece, Mary Williams Field in Leamington, England, in 1873; from his sister Rebecca in France in 1874 and in Middletown, Ct., in 1896; and from his cousin, Francis W. Ball, in 1908. Also included is autograph manuscript outlining his wishes in
regard to his burial in the old Williams lot in Deerfield.

Ephraim Williams, Jr., younger son on Ephraim27 and Rebecca (Jackson) Williams, was born in 1837. He entered military service by enlisting in Company C of the 27th Massachusetts Infantry in 1862. He also served in the 1st regiment of U.S. Volunteers and in the U.S. Infantry until his severe wounding in Kansas in September 1867. He returned to Deerfield and died there in 1902. The earliest of his papers are his musical composition “Master Tommy’s Married” (1847) and “The Adelphian Journal,” a manuscript Elm Seminary newspaper which he co-edited. Other papers, mainly correspondence, include letters from his sisters Rebecca and Eliza, Emily Gear, C. Alice Baker, Lizzie and Louis Higginson, and his commanding officer, D.H. Brotherton. Included also are three commissions: second lieutenant of the 5th regiment of infantry in 1866, first lieutenant of the regiment in 1867, and captain by brevet in 1868. See the papers of Eliza Dawes Williams for numerous letters from Ephraim Jr.

Solomon Williams21, son of Thomas14 and Esther (Williams) Williams and younger brother of William Stoddard Williams, was born in 1764. He was a farmer on the old homestead and was active in town affairs. He married Miranda, daughter of Jonathan Arms. Five of their seven children are named below. Solomon died in 1836, his widow in 1846. His papers include an order to imprison Nathanial Skinner Foster of Shelburne, Mass., for failure to satisfy Solomon’s judgment against him; letters from Samuel Saxton and his brother Ephraim19; his appointment as tax collector; his copy of the Greenfield Gazette in regard to the approaching election in 1810; lists of stall fed cattle driven to Brighton Market in 1828 and 1829; a later copy of his will dated January 28, 1829; and a small memorandum book with entries dated from 1801 to 1829. Filed with these is a letter addressed to his widow, Miranda, written shortly after her husband’s death by Harriet, the wife of their son, Henry.

Horace Williams28, oldest son of Solomon21 and Miranda (Arms) Williams, was born in 1784. Like his father, he became a farmer and settled in the Mill River district of Deerfield. In 1811, he married Mary, daughter of Seth Nims, and the couple had five children, one of whom is named below. Horace died in 1862, his wife in 1854. He is represented by three papers: a receipt for a heifer; a writ against three defendants, of whom he was one, for stealing turkeys; and a letter from Henry King Hoyt in regard to a candidate for state representative in the coming 1851 election.

Charles Edwin Williams37, son of Horace28 and Mary (Nims) Williams, was born in 1824. He became a farmer on the old homestead, and president of the Franklin County Agricultural Society and a town selectman. His wife Helen (Nellie) was a daughter of Elijah Field of Conway, Mass. He is represented by one paper, a deed to land at Mill River, which he sold to Cephas Clapp.

Henry Williams29, son of Solomon21 and Miranda (Arms) Williams, was born in 1786. He was a trader at Newton, Mass., and later moved to Boston where he was a successful merchant. In 1813, he married Harriet, daughter of Obadiah Dickinson of Northfield, Mass. The couple had six children. Henry died in 1857, his widow in 1866. His papers consist of letters received from his brother, Ralph (one preceded by a copy of their
father’s will), from his brother, Robert, and from his cousin, Ephraim.

Henry Williams38, son of Henry29 and Harriet (Dickinson) Williams, was born in 1816. He graduated from Harvard College in 1837, and became a teacher in Boston. He married Julia West, daughter of Ralph Williams30 in 1840. Henry died in 1901, Julia in 1877. His papers consist of two letters from his cousin, Ralph Williams Jr., and a letter from Samuel A. Jones in regard to Henry’s memorials of the class of 1837, and Jones’ bibliography of Thoreau. Filed with these is a letter to his wife Julia from her mother.

Ralph Williams30, son of Solomon21 and Miranda (Arms) Williams, was born in 1788. A farmer, he settled on the old homestead and took a prominent part in town affairs. His wife, Pamela, daughter of John Ware and the mother of his six children, died in 1852. The following year he married Rhoda, daughter of Quartus Wells. Ralph died in 1858, his widow in 1883. The earliest of his papers is a small gathering headed “Memorandum of money on hand October 22, 1844, on starting for Vermont after cattle.” Other papers consist of receipts, a letter from his son, Ralph, a copy of his will (January 1858), and a packet containing seven examples of Continental Currency.

Ralph Williams, Jr., son of Ralph30 and Pamela (Ware) Williams, was born in 1826. He is reported to have died in Australia in 1854. His papers consist entirely of letters from his young cousin, Rebecca Jackson Williams, who sent his news of his family and friends from 1849 to 1852.

Robert Williams31, son of Solomon21 and Miranda (Arms) Williams, was born in 1792. His first occupation was that of farmer, but he later turned to trade, first in Charlemont, Mass., and later in Boston. In 1823, he married Adeline, daughter of Epaphras Hoyt. She died in 1841; in 1844 he married a Miss Doliver. His papers consist of a receipt for money to be paid to Dr. Samuel Willard; a letter from his fatherin-law, Epaphras Hoyt, telling of the death of his wife Experience (1833).

Charles Williams43, son of Robert31 and Adeline (Hoyt) Williams, was born in 1830. He was a farmer in the Mill River district of Deerfield. In 1855, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Columbus Nelson. Two sons died before they were ten years old. A daughter apparently lived to adulthood. Charles died in 1872. He is represented by two deeds to land in the Mill River section of Deerfield, both dated 1865.

Charles Williams, son of Solomon21 and Miranda (Arms) Williams, was born in 1795. As a youth he worked on a farm and briefly in a store in Boston. Later he opened a pharmacy in Greenfield, Mass., where he was known as “Dr. Charles,” but about 1835 he returned to Deerfield where he served as town clerk for many years, and as Postmaster. In 1818, he married Tirzah, daughter of Rufus Saxton. Charles died in 1870, his widow in 1895. He is represented from 1820 to 1848 by business papers, (one being the lease of a brick and wooden store in Deerfield from his brother, John George), and by detailed weather and temperature records for the years 1857 to 1865. There are also a retained copy of a letter he wrote to Eben Nash relating to the great fire in Greenfield in 1826, a memorandum of births and deaths of early members of the Williams family, and a letter he wrote to his father, Solomon in 1829 (makes reference to the death of William Stoddard Williams).

John George Williams32, son of Solomon21 and Miranda (Arms) Williams, was born in 1805. He was a trader in Deerfield, but in the 1840s moved to Rochester, NY, where he was connected with the Rural New-Yorker. He married Maria, daughter of Asa Burbank of Lanesboro, Mass., in 1831; they had five children, one of whom is named below. John died in 1872, his widow in 1879. His papers consist mainly of business correspondence and other documents, the earliest a deed to land (including a store) in Deerfield, which he purchased from Augustus Lyman in 1829. There is a letter from his nephew, Henry Williams; a printed account, titled “Old Deerfield,” which he wrote on his return to Rochester after a visit to his old hometown; and the address pages only of ten letters
sent to him in Deerfield, one in Macon, Ga., and one in Boston.

Maria B. Williams, daughter of John George32 and Maria (Burbank) Williams, was born in 1836. Her writings, with her penname “Kate Cameron,” appeared in various publications. In 1856, she married Norman S. Barnes. She died in 1873. Her papers consist entirely of her writings, all but one compositions she wrote during her teens and
many endorsed with her family nickname of Kitty. [One gathering of her poems, presented by Eliza P. Barber of Meadville, Pa., was formerly cataloged as M.c No. 4474 in the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association library.]

Elijah Williams22, son of Thomas14 and Esther (Williams) Williams, was born in 1767. A saddler, known as “Uncle Josh,” he had a shop in Brattleboro, Vt., briefly, but returned to Deerfield and occupied what became known as the Ware Corner until selling out to Orlando Ware in 1801. He then took up residence on Lot 15, where he added pocketbook manufacturing to his saddlery business. He was register of deeds for Northern Hampshire Co. for five years, and Postmaster. In 1803, he married Hannah, daughter of Samuel Barnard. Elijah died in 1832, his widow in 1853. His papers include a letter from his brother-in-law, Jeremiah West, his commission as captain of Light Infantry (1824), a complaint against him by Lucy Barnard, several writs of attachment for which he obtained judgments, and a receipt for a deed. Most of his papers pertain to the settlement
of the estate of his sister, Cynthia Leffingwell, who had boarded with Elijah and Hannah for most of the time between 1812 and 1828. Filed with Elijah’s papers are also two papers of Hannah’s: letters from her son Elijah Dwight Williams.

Samuel Barnard Williams33, son of Elijah22 and Hannah (Barnard) Williams, was born in 1803. He was lieutenant of Franklin Cadets at their organization. He was a trader in Ashfield, Mass., for a time, and then moved to Savannah, Ga., where he lost all of his possessions in a fire. Later he lived in Springfield, Ohio, and in Kansas, where he was judge of probate for Leavenworth County. He returned to Deerfield about 1873, and died there in 1884. His first wife was Mary A. Bennett of Ashfield. She died in 1839. In 1844, he married Caroline E. Johnson, who lived until 1885. He and his wife Caroline are represented by two papers: a deed to land in Deerfield, purchased from his sisters Elizabeth and Caroline; and their appointment, as residents of Kansas, of George Wright
of Deerfield to be their attorney. Included also is a survey of Caroline Williams home lot in 1885.

Caroline Williams, daughter of Elijah22 and Hannah (Barnard) Williams, was born in 1812 and died, unmarried, in 1875. She is represented by a poem, dated June 6, 1826.

Elijah Dwight Williams, son of Elijah22 and Hannah (Barnard) Williams, was born in 1817. He was a student at Northfield, Mass., and entered Harvard College at the age of fourteen, graduating in 1835. For a time he was amanuensis to Historian William H. Prescott. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1839. He continued to practice in Boston and died at the home of his cousin, Henry Williams, in Chelsea. His papers largely consist of correspondence: numerous letters from his sister, Caroline, and letters
from his mother and brothers, Samuel Barnard and Richard. His cousin, John Williams, later bishop, was a frequent correspondent, as were Charles Vose Bemis, Samuel Willard, Jr., and William H. Prescott. His papers also include a notebook, papers on “Pedantry” and “Lord Duberly and Doctor Pangloss,” and accounts and receipts while he was a student at Harvard. There are letters from President Quincy in 1840 and 1841 announcing meetings of committees to examine the sophomore class on Horace and Cicero, and the juniors in Juvenal (in each case Elijah Dwight Williams was a member of the committee).

Isabella Hoyt Williams, wife of Elijah Dwight Williams, was born in Nov. 1804 to
Epaphras and Experience Hoyt. In 1825, she married Williams; after his death she married David Bryant in 1841. Her papers consist of letters from family members and friends, a prenuptial agreement regarding her inheritance of Elijah Williams’s estate, and a copy of her will made by Arthur W. Hoyt.

Stephen West Williams, son of Thomas14 and Esther (Williams) Williams was born in
1769. He was only six when his father died, and was sent to live with his uncle, Reverend Stephen West, in Stockbridge, Mass. He was educated at Yale, designed for the ministry, but instead studied medicine with his uncle, Dr. Sergeant, of Stockbridge. He died of consumption, without issue, in 1790. His papers consist mainly of correspondence, including letters from his brother Elijah22, his sisters Cynthia Leffingwell and Polly West, and his brother-in-law, Jeremiah West; also from A [ ] Morris and Jeremiah Atwater (friends at Yale), William Edwards of Elizabethtown, NJ, and Hugo Burghardt of Stockbridge, Mass. A daybook, 1785-1789, and another for the months January to July
1787, are part of his papers.

The following three men lived in Deerfield but were not descendents of Robert Williams1. George Sheldon includes brief notes on each man on pages 374-76 of his Williams genealogical notes:
Isaac Williams, born in 1784, was a merchant at Bloody Brook (now South Deerfield) in
company with Thomas Porter. He married Mary, daughter of Dr. Benjamin Burgess of Goshen, Mass. He died in 1807. He is represented by one paper, a promissory note by Ambrose Potter of Rowe, Mass., to Thomas Porter and Isaac Williams.
Artemus Williams was born in Goshen, Mass., in 1792. He came to Deerfield about 1814, and was prominent in town affairs. He married Amelia, daughter of Elijah Arms in 1817. He is represented by two papers: a collectors’ bond of Williams and Seth Nims, surety, to the inhabitants of Deerfield; and a deed to land in Hawley, Mass., which he and his wife sold to Zimri Long of Hawley.
Zebediah Williams was born in 1675. He and his half-brother, John Arms, were captured by Indians and carried to Canada in 1703. He died there in 1706. His widow, Sarah, daughter of Williams Arms, later married Samuel Jones. He is represented by an inventory of his estate, December 1706. This is followed by an oath to the judge of probate, February 4, 1706/7, by his widow Sarah and William Arms, administrators of the estate.

James Williams, said to have been a tailor, served in Captain Joseph Stebbins’ company of Colonel Brewer’s regiment in 1775. He is represented by a portion of a letter from Isaac Meriam of Concord, Mass., in September 1787.

Eleazer Williams, born about 1789, was an Episcopal missionary and Indian leader of
mixed Indian-White parentage. In the 1830s he proclaimed himself the “lost dauphin” of France, Louis XVII. He died in poverty in Hogansville, NY, in 1858. He is represented by the recipient’s copy of a letter he wrote to his cousin, William Barker, a student at Brown College in 1807; a reproduction of his portrait by George Catlin, included in Antiques
magazine for November 1976; and a typescript register of the Eleazer Williams Papers in the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, center in Green Bay. The register is prefaced by a biographical note and information on the provenance of the material.

Williams, Carey & Company of Virginia: Papers relating to trespass upon the case of
Daniel Lovell and James Pink against Thomas Williams, Joseph Cary, and John Williams,
copartners in trade under the name of Williams, Cary & Company.

Container List
Box 1
Folder 1 Williams Family Tree
Folder 1a Papers of Thomas Williams15 undated letter (1 item)
Folder 2 Papers of Ebenezer Hinsdale Williams23, 1792-1838 (10 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Thomas Williams, Jr., 1789-1809 (4 items)
Folder 4 Papers of John Williams5, 1705-1729 and undated (12 items)
Folder 5 Papers re: John Williams5 (for letters to son Stephen, see folder 9) (6 items)
Folder 6 Paper of Eleazer Williams9, 1706 (1 item)
Folder 7 Paper of Samuel Williams [b. 1690, d. 1713], 1711 (1 item)
Folder 8 Papers of Stephen Williams10, 1706-1781 (31 items)
Folder 9 Writings of Stephen Williams10 incl. copy of Sin Testified Against inscribed to
Abigail and Mary Williams from their grandfather, Stephen.
Folder 10 Papers re: Stephen Williams10, (photocopies & clippings) (16 items)
Folder 11 Paper of Abigail (Davenport) Williams, diary (1 item)
Folder 12 Transcript of Abigail (Davenport) Williams diary (1 item)
Folder 13 Papers of Samuel and his wife Lucy Burt Williams (3 items)
Folder 14 Papers of Rev. Warham Williams11, 1723-1773 (16 items)
Folder 15 Papers of Rev. Samuel Williams, 1784-1802 (5 items)

Box 2 Papers of Rev. Samuel Williams: sermons (225 items)
Sermons dated Feb. 12, 1764 to May 6, 1770, and numbered:
6, 11, 14, 26, 40, 42, 50, 53, 55, 58, 61, 66, 84, 89, 92, 98, 108, 111, 114, 116, 126,
132, 136, 137, 138, 139, 141, 144, 151, 155, 156, 157, 160, 167, 173, 176, 181, 186,
191, 192, 197, 200, 201, 207, 210, 212, 214, 216, 221, 224, 230, 231, 237, 240, 243,
246, 252, 259, 284, 287, 300, 308, 309, 315, 316, 317, 318, 334, 343, 349, 358, 362,
363, 364, 365, 370, 372, 382, 385.
Sermons (unnumbered) dated between Feb. 26, 1769 and Nov. 27, 1808:
1769 – 3, 1770 – 1, 1771 – 7, 1772 – 8, 1773 – 8, 1774 – 9, 1775 – 14, 1776 – 13,
1777 – 9, 1778 – 13, 1779 – 5, 1790 – 5, 1791 – 1, 1792 – 3, 1793 – 4, 1794 – 11,
1795 – 1, 1806 – 1, 1807 – 2, 1808 – 3,
Sermons (unnumbered and undated) (34 items)

Box 3
Folder 1 Papers of Abigail (Williams) Hinsdale Hall Silliman, 1759-1764 (6 items); papers
of her 1st husband, Ebenezer Hinsdale, 1751-1766 (5 items)
Folder 2 Papers of Abigail (Williams) Hinsdale Hall Silliman, 1766-1773 (4 items); papers of her 2nd husband, Benjamin Hall, 1767-1772 and undated, (4 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Abigail (Williams) Hinsdale Hall Silliman, 1773-1788 (28 items); papers of her 3rd husband, Ebenezer Silliman, 1773 (2 items) Also a photocopy of her will.
Folder 4 Papers of Elijah Williams12, 1735-1749, and his wife Lydia, 1747 (25 items)
Folder 5 Papers of Elijah Williams12, 1750-1755 (26 items)
Folder 6 Papers of Elijah Williams12, 1756-1759 (28 items)
Folder 7 Papers of Elijah Williams12, 1760-1764 (26 items)
Folder 8 Papers of Elijah Williams12, 1765-1770 and his wife Margaret, 1770 and undated (26 items)
Folder 9 Papers of Elijah Williams12, undated (25 items)
Folder 10 Papers relating to Elijah Williams’ estate, 1771-1773 (12 items)
Folder 10a Papers pertaining to the French & Indian War, 1747-1758 (20 items)
Folder 11 Papers of Elijah Williams, Jr. 1760-1771 (42 items)
Folder 12 Papers of Elijah Williams, Jr. 1771 Aug.-1772 Apr. (37 items)
Folder 13 Papers of Elijah Williams, Jr. 1772 May – Dec. (33 items)
Folder 14 Papers of Elijah Williams, Jr. 1773 (46 items)
Folder 15 Papers of Elijah Williams, Jr. 1774 (63 items)
Folder 16 Papers of Elijah Williams, Jr. 1775-1793 (29 items)
Folder 17 Papers of Elijah Williams, Jr. undated (9 items)
Folder 18 Papers relating to the settlement of his estate, 1793-1797 (14 items)
Folder 19 Papers of Eunice Williams, 1771, 1773 (2 items)

Box 4
Folder 1 Papers of John Williams16, 1765-1770 (66 items)
Folder 2 Papers of John Williams16, 1771 (21 items)
Folder 3 Papers of John Williams16, 1772-1773 (37 items)
Folder 4 Papers of John Williams16, 1774-1778 (38 items)
Folder 5 Papers of John Williams16, 1779 (45 items)
Folder 6 Papers of John Williams16, 1780-1784 (41 items)
Folder 7 Papers of John Williams16, 1785-1786 (28 items)
Folder 8 Papers of John Williams16, 1787-1788 (30 items)
Folder 9 Papers of John Williams16, 1789-1790 (36 items)
Folder 10 Papers of John Williams16, 1791-1792 (37 items)
Folder 11 Papers of John Williams16, 1793-1794 (21 items)

Box 5
Folder 1 Papers of John Williams16, 1795-1799 (16 items)
Folder 2 Papers of John Williams16, `1800-1803 (20 items)
Folder 3 Papers of John Williams16, 1804-1816 (18 items)
Folder 4 His papers relating to the Harvard Lottery, General, 1788-1806 (23 items)
Folder 5 His papers relating to the Harvard Lottery, General, 1807-1808 (17 items)
Folder 6 His papers relating to the Harvard Lottery, General, 1809 (13 items)
Folder 7 Papers of John Williams16 re Harvard Lottery; 1st Class 1807 (5 items)
Folder 8 Papers of John Williams16 re Harvard Lottery; 2nd Class 1807-1808 (17 items)
Folder 9 Papers of John Williams16 re Harvard Lottery; 3rd Class 1807-1809 (9 items)
Folder 10 Papers of John Williams16 re Harvard Lottery; 4th Class 1808 (7 items)
Folder 11 Papers of John Williams16 re Harvard Lottery; Undated (23 items)
Folder 12 Papers of Williams and Upham, undated (9 items)
Folder 13 John Williams’ Court Book, records as Justice of the Peace, Feb. 12, 1799- Sep. 4, 1801 (1 vol.)
Folder 14 Papers of Eunice Williams, 1817, 1818, 1832 (3 items)

Box 6
Folder 1 Papers of Richard Williams, 1789-1793 and undated (12 items)
Folder 2 Papers of Richard Williams, “Arithmetical Manuscriptum” 1791 (1 vol.) [formerly N-Pers. No. 5036 in PVMA library]
Folder 3 Papers of John Williams, Jr., 1790-1798 (39 items)
Folder 4 Papers of John Williams, Jr., 1799 (24 items)
Folder 5 Papers of John Williams, Jr., 1800 (33 items)
Folder 6 Papers of John Williams, Jr., 1801 (31 items)
Folder 7 Papers of John Williams, Jr., 1802-1803 (22 items)
Folder 8 Papers of John Williams, Jr., 1804-1805 (47 items)
Folder 9 Papers of John Williams, Jr., 1806-1806 (19 items)
Folder 10 Papers of John Williams, Jr., Undated (7 items)

Box 7 Notebook kept by William Williams6 (in Diary Coll.)
Folder 1 Papers of Williams Williams17 and his wife Hannah, 1740-1796 (7 items)
Folder 2 Paper of Elizabeth Williams, 1756 (1 item)
Folder 3 Paper of Rev. Elisha Williams, 1718 (1 item)
Folder 4 Papers of Rev. Solomon Williams, 1768, 1769 (2 items)
Folder 5 Paper of Ezekiel Williams, 1801 (1 item)
Folder 6 Papers of Col. Israel Williams, 1741-1787 (24 items)
Folder 7 Paper of Israel Williams, Jr. 1776 (1 item)
Folder 8 Papers of William Williams of Hatfield and Dalton, 1773-1807 (3 items)
Folder 9 Papers of Dorothy (Ashley) Williams, 1760-1821 (18 items)
Folder 10 Papers of Dolly Williams, 1785-1817 (22 items); papers of her sister-in-law, Nancy Williams, 1817 (1 item)
Folder 11 Papers of charlotte (Williams) Porter, 1800-1811 and her son, James Porter, 1814, 1817 (5 items)
Folder 12 Papers of Caroline W. Porter, 1812-1821 (16 items)
Folder 13 Paper of Abigail (Jones) Williams, 1754 (1 item)
Folder 14 Papers of Ephraim Williams, 1755 and undated (5 items)

Box 8
Folder 1 Papers of Thomas Williams14: notebooks on medical subjects, 1738 (3 items)
Folder 2 Papers of Thomas Williams14, 1746-1759 (32 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Thomas Williams14, 1760-1764 (14 items)
Folder 4 Papers of Thomas Williams14, 1765-1768 (29 items)
Folder 5 Papers of Thomas Williams14, 1769-1773 (36 items)
Folder 6 Papers of Thomas Williams14, 1774-1775 (12 items)
Folder 7 Papers relating to his estate, 1775-1797 (16 items)
Folder 8 Papers of Esther Williams, 1751-1788 (24 items)
Folder 9 Papers of Esther Williams, 1789-1800 (27 items)
Folder 10 Paper of Anna (Williams) Dwight, 1804 (1 item)

Box 9
Folder 1 Papers of Ephraim Williams19, 1777-1816 (22 items; includes diploma from Williams College)
Folder 2 Papers of Ephraim Williams19, 1817-1830 (16 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Emily (Trowbridge) Williams, 1816-1839 (4 items)
Folder 4 Papers of John Williams, 1837-1880 and undated (8 items); also one volume, 1849, and box containing seal
Folder 5 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, 1781-1785 (29 items)
Folder 6 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, 1786-1796 (24 items)
Folder 7 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, 1797-1800 (18 items)
Folder 8 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, 1801-1804 (26 items)
Folder 9 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, 1805-1809 (25 items)
Folder 10 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, 1810-1819 (22 items)
Folder 11 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, 1820-1828 (19 items)

Box 10
Folder 1 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, promissory notes and receipts, 1786- 1828 (64 items)
Folder 2 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20; Orders for medical supplies 1785-1795 (30 items)
Folder 3 Orders for medical supplies 1796-1804 (31 items)
Folder 4 Orders for medical supplies 1805-1828 (45 items)
Folder 5 Miscellaneous records of treatments and prescriptions, 1786-1826 (30 items)
Folder 6 Papers of William Stoddard Williams20, undated (15 items)
Folder 7 Papers of Alexander Williams34, diary for 1835-1838, 1853, 1855-1858 (1 vol.)
Folder 8 Papers of Alexander Williams34, 1832-1837 (5 items)
Folder 9 Paper of Mrs. M. C. Williams, 1853-1855 (1 vol.)

Box 11 Papers of Stephen West Williams25
Folder 1 Correspondence, 1799, 1811-1839 (29 items)
Folder 2 Correspondence, 1840-1852 and undated (32 items)
Folder 3 Account book, mainly 1830s but a few entries as early as 1819 and as late as 1850
(1 vol.); and surgical notes, two gatherings. SEE ALSO account books (1841-1853; 1850-1853)
Folder 4 Notes on medical cases (10 items)
Folder 5 Notes on medical cases (pages 5-351 & appendix, 6 pp.) (1 item)

Box 12 Papers of Stephen West Williams25
Folder 1 Biographical memoir of Rev. John Williams, 69 pp. (1 item)
Folder 2 Brief biography of his father, William Stoddard Williams, 2 pp. (1 item)
Folder 3 Ancient History of Pocomptuck or Deerfield: preamble, 2 pp.; ms. draft, pp. 1-112,
133-142; appendix, 30 pp. (3 items in all)
Folder 4a A few brief recollections of Ancient Deerfield, collected from Mrs. Bradley, aged
88 years …. 24 pp.
Folder 4b Ms. on “American Independence.” Written in Laona, Illinois, July 4, 1855, 16 pp. [gift of his daughter, Caroline W. Putnam; [formerly Mw no.4973 in the PVMA library]
Folder 5 Poem “To the Members of the Family of Williams in America” 99 pp.; copy of
letter to Mr. Prindle, indicating certain changes in the proem, 1847; “Family of Williams” 44 pp.; description of Williams coat of arms, 3pp. (4 items)
Folder 6 Rough draft of his “Historico Genealogical Account of the Family of Williams in
America & other matters,”folios 1-82, 82-254, 257, and incomplete page (1 item)
Folder 7 a) Historico Genealogical Account of the Family of Williams in America & other
matters” no.1 46 pp. (1-26 numbered) (1 item); b) Same, no. 2 150 ms. Folios (1-11, 11-149 and 4 unnumbered (1 item)

No Box 13

Box 14 Papers of Stephen West Williams25
1) Manuscript notes on scientific lectures, thought to be by Dr. Williams [formerly N-pers.
5047 in the PVMA library, gift of Oren Wiley] (1 item)
2) Commonplace book

Box 15
Folder 1 Papers of Stephen West Williams25, incomplete papers for lectures and addresses
(12 items)
Folder 2 “Lives in Medicine: The Biographical Dictionaries of Thatcher, Williams and Gross,” by Whitfield J. Bell, Jr. [reprinted from Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Vol. xlii, no. 2, Mar.-Apr. 1968]
Folder 3 Papers of Caroline (Williams) Putnam: carbon of a typescript poem attributed to
her, 1905, n.d. (2 items)
Folder 4 Papers of Ephraim Williams27, 1822-1867 (7 items)
Folder 5 Papers of Rebecca (Jackson) Williams, 1833, 1851-1868 (19 items)
Folder 5a Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, Diary 1853 (1 item)
Folder 6 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, letters from her brother, Ephraim, 1830s-1862
(40 items)
Folder 7 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, Jan.-June 1863 (23 items)
Folder 8 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, July-Dec. 1863 (28 items)
Folder 9 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, Jan.-June 1864 (37 items)

Box 16
Folder 1 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, letters from her brother Ephraim, July-Dec.
1864 (43 items)
Folder 2 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, Jan.-June 1865 (26 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, July-Dec. 1865 (26 items)
Folder 4 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, Jan.-June 1866 (20 items)
Folder 5 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, July-Dec. 1866 (17 items)
Folder 6 Same, 1867-Mar. 1868 (32 items)
Folder 7 Papers of Eliza (Dawes) Williams, letters from her sister Rebecca, 1872-1897 (30 items)
Folder 8 Papers of Mary (Williams) Wilson, 1840-ca. 1859 (10 items)

Box 17
Folder 1 Papers of Rebecca (Williams) Field, 1840-1864 (45 items)
Folder 2 Papers of Rebecca (Williams) Field, 1866-1879 (25 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Rebecca (Williams) Field, 1880-1904 and undated (51 items)
Folder 4 Papers of William Stoddard Williams, 1873-1908 (8 items)
Folder 5 Papers of Ephraim Williams, Jr., 1847-1899 and undated (25 items)

Box 18
Folder 1 Papers of Solomon Williams21, 1787-1829 (12 items) and of his wife, Miranda, 1866 (1 item)
Folder 2 Papers of Horace Williams28, 1799, 1826, 1851 (3 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Charles E. Williams37, 1855; 1863 (2 items)
Folder 4 Papers of Henry Williams29, 1811-1836 (5 items)
Folder 5 Papers of Henry Williams38, 1853, 1890 (4 items) and his wife Julia, 1842 (1 item)
Folder 6 Papers of Ralph Williams30, 1844, 1850-1858 (10 items)
Folder 7 Papers of Ralph Williams, Jr., 1849-1852 (8 items)
Folder 8 Papers of Robert Williams31, 1831, 1833 (2 items)
Folder 9 Papers of Charles Williams43, 1865 (7 items)
Folder 10 Papers of Charles Williams, 1820-1865 (14 items)
Folder 11 Papers of John George Williams32, 1829-1847 (24 items)
Folder 12 Papers of Maria B. Williams, 1848-1854 and undated (33 items)
Folder 13 Papers of Elijah Williams22, 1800-1831 (41 items) and his wife, Hannah Williams, 1836-1838 (2 items)
Folder 14 Papers of Samuel Barnard Williams33, 1849, 1867 (2 items) and Caroline E.
Williams, 1885 (1 item)
Folder 15 Papers of Caroline Williams, 1826 (1 item)
Folder 16 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, while a student at Harvard, 1832-1835 (10
items)
Folder 17 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, accounts and receipts while at Harvard and studying law, 1832-1838 (62 items)
Folder 18 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, 1833-1834 (25 items)
Folder 19 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, 1835 (22 items)
Folder 20 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, 1836-1837 (32 items)
Folder 21 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, 1838 (9 items)

Box 19
Folder 1 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, 1839 (28 items)
Folder 2 Papers of Elijah Dwight Williams, 1849-1841 (29 items)
Folder 2a Papers of Isabella Hoyt Williams, 1829-1844 (35 items)
Folder 3 Papers of Stephen West Williams, 1785-1789 (20 items)
Folder 4 Paper of Isaac Williams, 1807 (1 item)
Folder 5 Papers of Artemus Williams, Apr. and May 1822 (6 items)
Folder 6 Paper of Zebediah Williams, 1706/7 (1 item)
Folder 7 Paper of James Williams, 1787 (1 item)
Folder 8 Paper of Martha A. Williams of Conway, only month and day given (1 item)
Folder 9 Papers of Eleazer Williams: ms. Letter, 1807; reproduction of his portrait by George Catlin; and register of his papers in Wisconsin (3 items)
Folder 10 Papers of Williams, Cary & Co. of Virginia, 1789-1790 (5 items)
Folder 11 Accounts and other papers of otherwise unidentified persons surnamed Williams, 1760-1869 (11 items)
Folder 12 Mathematical calculations found with Williams Papers during the 1959-1960 cataloging (5 items)
Folder 13 Miscellany: manuscripts (32 items)
Folder 14 Miscellany: drawings, photographs & printed material
Folder 15 Misc. typescripts and reproductions, including transcript of Jerusha Williams’ diary, 1824
Folder 16 Sarah Williams (1716- 1736/7): photocopies, 1738/39 (2 items)

Box 20 Reproductions:
Folder 1 Photocopies of manuscript on display is the Dwight-Barnard House
Folder 2 Photocopies of Williams papers in the New York Historical Society
Folder 3 Photocopies of Williams Papers in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania
Folder 4 Miscellaneous types of photography in various repositories
Folder 5 Typescript copy of Stephen West Williams’ history of Deerfield
Folder 6 Miscellaneous copies in manuscript, typescript and print, including transcript of
memoir of John Williams (b. 1767) of Hatfield and Dalton, begun in 1784.
Folder 7 Photocopies of Eleazer Williams’ papers in the Missouri Historical Society
Folder 8 Memorial by Charles B. DeSaileville on Eunice Williams, the captive, from the
original in the Missouri Historical Society (negative Photostat). Also a letter to Eleazer Williams from DeSaileville regarding this and a “dedicatory epistle” to the descendants of Eunice Williams copied from microfilm reel M922.3 W722L. (Originals are owned by the Missouri Historical Society)
Folder 9 Photocopies of papers of William Williams (1665-1741) of Hatfield in the Vt.
State Archives

Box 21 Material relating to the Williams family
Folder 1 Geo. Sheldon correspondence about the Williams family, 1864-1899
Folder 2 Geo. Sheldon correspondence about the Williams family, 1900-1915
Folder 3 Correspondence regarding Eleazer Williams and the “lost dauphin”
Folder 4 Geo. Sheldon’s list of editions of The Redeemed Captive
Folder 5 Geo. Sheldon’s notes, mainly about Rev. John Williams and captivity
Folder 6 Geo. Sheldon’s notes and article
Folder 7 Geo. Sheldon’s genealogical data about the Williams family
Folder 8 Newspaper clippings about Geo. Sheldon articles
Folder 9 Geo. Sheldon notes on John Williams’ house, including his article
Folder 10 Miscellaneous correspondence and other material re. the Williams family

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